What Should I Be Looking Out for in my Spill Kit Arrangements?

Following on from our previous blog on why you need spill kits (read here), this blog will focus on your spill kit arrangements.  Just having spill kits on your site will not be enough, you will need the right type, of the right quantity, in the right location.  Read on for more information.

What type of spill kit do I need?

There are 3 main types of spill kit: oil, chemical and general.  Spill kits are typically specialist in what they will absorb, so oil spill kits will absorb hydrocarbons and chemical spill kits will absorb chemicals.  General spill kits absorb everything, including water so are not suitable for use outside.  You may also want to consider neutralisers like soda ash for use on an acid spill to make it safer to deal with.  You should consider what your spill risk areas are, what the spilled material is and ensure there is the correct spill kit nearby.

How much spill kit do I need?

Spill kits come in sizes in litres, telling you how much liquid the kit can absorb, for example 30, 240 and 1000 litres.  The aim is for you to have enough spill kit to contain a large spillage.  If you have a large fuel tank, you will not store enough spill kit to absorb all of the contents; you will be looking at enough spill kit to contain the spillage until a specialist contractor can attend.  You should also consider whether your spill risk justifies having spill kit spares on site.  Some sites will use little spill kit and have a robust and quick re-ordering process whereas other sites will need spares to hand to cover after an incident.

Where should my spill kits be?

Spill kits must be accessible to your spill risk areas.  If your areas are close together, you may have a spill kit station to cover multiple areas, but you must be able to get to them quickly and you must have enoug.  They should be easily accessible, and you should be able to identify them quickly.  You may have location signage as well as labels on your containers.  A site plan that staff are aware of with spill kits marked on it will also be useful.

What else do I need to look out for?

Regular checks on your spill kits are essential to ensure they are full and in good condition.  You should use good containers that are easy to see and are weather proof and not damaged.  You may also want to consider using tamper tags on spill kits so they aren’t accidentally used as bins or kit taken out and used indiscriminately.

Spill kits are essential for sites to ensure you manage the potential pollution risk from storing hazardous substances.  It is essential that you employ the correct spill kit, of the required quantity and place them in areas where they will be easily accessible.

Following on from our previous blog on why you need spill kits (read here), this blog will focus on your spill kit arrangements.  Just having spill kits on your site will not be enough, you will need the right type, of the right quantity, in the right location.  Read on for more information.

What type of spill kit do I need?

There are 3 main types of spill kit: oil, chemical and general.  Spill kits are typically specialist in what they will absorb, so oil spill kits will absorb hydrocarbons and chemical spill kits will absorb chemicals.  General spill kits absorb everything, including water so are not suitable for use outside.  You may also want to consider neutralisers like soda ash for use on an acid spill to make it safer to deal with.  You should consider what your spill risk areas are, what the spilled material is and ensure there is the correct spill kit nearby.

How much spill kit do I need?

Spill kits come in sizes in litres, telling you how much liquid the kit can absorb, for example 30, 240 and 1000 litres.  The aim is for you to have enough spill kit to contain a large spillage.  If you have a large fuel tank, you will not store enough spill kit to absorb all of the contents; you will be looking at enough spill kit to contain the spillage until a specialist contractor can attend.  You should also consider whether your spill risk justifies having spill kit spares on site.  Some sites will use little spill kit and have a robust and quick re-ordering process whereas other sites will need spares to hand to cover after an incident.

Where should my spill kits be?

Spill kits must be accessible to your spill risk areas.  If your areas are close together, you may have a spill kit station to cover multiple areas, but you must be able to get to them quickly and you must have enoug.  They should be easily accessible, and you should be able to identify them quickly.  You may have location signage as well as labels on your containers.  A site plan that staff are aware of with spill kits marked on it will also be useful.

What else do I need to look out for?

Regular checks on your spill kits are essential to ensure they are full and in good condition.  You should use good containers that are easy to see and are weather proof and not damaged.  You may also want to consider using tamper tags on spill kits so they aren’t accidentally used as bins or kit taken out and used indiscriminately.

Spill kits are essential for sites to ensure you manage the potential pollution risk from storing hazardous substances.  It is essential that you employ the correct spill kit, of the required quantity and place them in areas where they will be easily accessible.